Abilify: My Fight with Schizophrenia

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We all know that mental health is a hot topic right now and with the expat market depression and mental health can be a big problem. You’ve moved to the other side of the world, you’ve had to start your life again, and for most of us, you’re no longer at the age when you can party your way through the week. Something you might not be aware of is schizophrenia is more common than you thought.

Abilify: My Fight with Schizophrenia

The diagnosis that I have established is known as F20 in the medical world. In simple words, my diagnosis is acute schizophrenia, and the code serves to label you for the whole life because this psychical disorder is incurable. This disease has four stages, and it is mostly discovered in the acute phase, when symptoms can escalate.
Visiting a psychiatrist on time, and getting an appropriate combination of drugs, and this psychological disorder can be put under control, but manic attacks will follow you for the lifetime. If the doctor prescribes the proper therapy, the patients can lead a very high quality and fulfilled life, regardless of the diagnosis and the code.
I’ll try to describe my fight with schizophrenia; to be more precise, my diagnosis is known as paranoid schizophrenia. I found out about it in my early twenties, although the symptoms appeared much earlier, in high-school. Only after a few years, I am aware that my parents have neglected my condition, attributing my episodes of madness to youth and my wild character. Whether because of ignorance or shame, I do not know.
I tried with various antidepressants, but after a while, probably the organism developed resistance to them. From 2015 and on, I am on therapy with Aripiprazole, which can be purchased in the site https://www.meds4sure.com/buy-abilify-aripiprazole-online.htmlhttps://www.meds4sure.com/buy-abilify-aripiprazole-online.html or other pharmacy stores under the brand name Abilify. It seems to me that it still works. Although initially, I was not thrilled, as well as for any therapy, it took some time to adapt the organism to the new antipsychotic.
Prodromal Phase
The first thing that changed was sleep. Over the last two weeks before my mental breakdown, it was becoming more and more difficult for me to fall asleep. Until this moment, I always thought that happens because of my hyperactivity.
It was a strange feeling for a 24-year-old man, an active athlete that I would go to bed at night, but then I could not even close my eyes. I would lie in one position while many thoughts created chaos in my brain; I think I remembered some things that I pushed deep into memory. Sometimes I would cover my head with a blanket, tighten my face with fists and whisper to myself: “Come on now. Stop. Shut up.”
In the end, I managed to fall asleep, but only to wake up feeling quite unusual, as if I forgot to say something to someone. Even my appetite was not as good as it was before. Earlier, I could go to the kitchen anytime, and made myself a meal that was enough for three persons; because of regular training and games, I could afford it to myself without the guilt of conscience.
But now I was waking up every morning with some discomfort and nausea in my stomach. I continued with my life, convinced that it would pass if I focused on training. There were some problems with a girlfriend too, so I thought that it also had an impact on my behavior.
Breakdown
I started to lose my focus. The feeling that someone was watching me was present all the time. When my trainer talked to me, it took me a few seconds to process this information because I had the impression that two or three people at the same time were telling me the same thing.
I kept hearing the phone ringing, tapping the ball on the parquet floor. One evening, quite unexpectedly, since I was relatively calm, eating snacks and watching TV, I felt that I had a panic attack. Or I even thought it. The walls were pressing me; it felt like the ceiling will fall on my head every second. I felt my body is ice cold, although I was sweating.
I just threw things off myself, curled up in the corner of the bed, and stayed in that position until the morning. I can’t even remember all the bizarre things that came to my mind; I only know that I was scared. Although I was aware that something is wrong with me, this was a trigger to visit a psychiatrist.
Therapy with Abilify
I won’t describe you my previous therapies. Three or four have been changed so far, and I am currently on Abilify. That is a drug that belongs to the second generation of antipsychotics. It means that these are improved versions of earlier antidepressants; symptoms like the appearance of suicidal or intrusive thoughts or manic episodes are reduced.
The progress of antidepressant is also reflected in the fact that the FDA allows Abilify for use in adolescents, for treating conditions, such as Tourette’s syndrome, bipolar disorder, or the onset of the first symptoms of depression and schizophrenia. In addition to the Aripiprazole therapy, doctors often prescribe mood stabilizers in younger patients.
Improvements
Aripiprazole is well absorbed; within three days, the organism eliminates this substance, so the patient can’t create an addiction. It binds 99% to serum proteins and affects the control of a dopamine level. Abilify is used to treat conditions that are characterized by symptoms, such as the feeling of ecstasy, excess energy, fast and confused speech, and pronounced irritability. It also prevents the recurrence of the disease that is possible after the therapy has canceled.
Given the delayed reaction to my condition, I started the therapy with a higher dose of 20mg, otherwise, 10-15mg is prescribed, and in adolescents, no more than 5mg. The long-term use of Aripiprazole, apart from the efficacy, has shown high tolerance, which I am observing by myself. The reported side effects are prevalent in every antidepressant. In addition to nausea, headache, tiredness, and so on, my vision was blurred for few days. Tell your doctor if you are taking any additional therapy, such as medicines for pressure, diabetes, or healing of liver and kidney disease.
Thanks to Abilify, I can say that I’m having an almost normal life now. Signs of my psychosis are under control, although I still have episodes from time to time. Regular visits to the doctor and the matching therapy will give the best results; it is necessary to take your illness seriously.